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46,206 Chairs

Whether it's a rocking chair for the front porch or a cushy armchair for your reading nook, we all need a seat or two (or three) in our home. A recliner or chaise lounge is always a popular living room addition, while a glider, reading chair or massage chair is relaxing in a bedroom. Regardless of what you're looking for, the options are endless, and the search is overwhelming. As you add to your seating options, consider the following in your search. More 
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What kind of accent chairs do I need?


There are many different styles, so finding the right one to fit in the right spot can be a daunting task. Before shopping for new seating, get a feel for what you're looking for. Are you trying to round out your living room set? Comfort is key, so look for an wingback, chaise lounge or recliner. Want to fill that empty corner in your dining room (and also have additional dining room seating on hand)? Opt for a more casual side or accent chair. Looking for really relax in your bedroom or nursery? Gliders and rockers will put you to sleep in no time. Once you figure out its function, it's easy to narrow down your options.

What style chairs work for my space?


As you pick out the pattern, color and material, start by understanding what you like and what will blend in (or stand out) in your current decor. A tufted or wingback club chair gives off an elegant, sophisticated vibe, while an piece with nailhead details or chevron pattern is more contemporary. Bring a pop of color to your space with a bright or multicolored option, or add some much-needed pattern in an all-white room. You can also add style by experimenting with material. Leather and wood are classic options, while an upholstered or plastic piece can veer more modern, depending on the other finishes. When it comes to material, you want to think about both practicality and design; after all, wood and plastic are more durable when little kids or pets are involved since they're easy to wipe up and hard to ruin.

How do I determine whether a recliner or chair is ergonomically correct?


Most often, this applies to office chairs where people spend hours sitting. However, any piece that you spend time in should be ergonomically appropriate. To start, test out all options you’re considering for purchase — your body will innately know whether it’s right for you or not. If it feels good, check out the back support, particularly for kitchen or dining room options that are generally more upright. The lower portion should provide support while being slightly curved to follow the contour of your spine. As for the seat, it should feel comfortable when you first sit down and stay that way for several hours. There should be at least an inch of space between your body and the sides of the furniture to allow for some movement. If you’re looking for an option with arms, make sure their height is proportionate to your body. If they’re too high, you’ll have trouble relaxing your shoulders while your arms are resting.