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From simple to modern to rustic, garage doors do more than protect your motor vehicles. They also add aesthetic value to your home and can make or break an exterior design scheme. Therefore, it’s important to not only select one that complements your impeccable home design style, but also one with features that meet your needs. Garage door openers, panel styles, insulation, locks, seals and more are all important considerations. With so much to choose from, it’s nice to have a quick guide to get you on the right track. That’s what we’re here for, so check out these handy tips while you browse on Houzz: More 
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What garage door styles are available?
Did we mention you have a variety of styles to choose from? Don’t be fooled into thinking you’re stuck with the ubiquitous, boring stock doors; you can go as fancy, modern or as simple as you like. Whether you’re going for full customization or a semi-customized style, here are some features you can add to yours:
• Flush panels: If you prefer the largest gateway into your home to blend in with the rest of the exterior and not draw any attention to itself, flat flush panels are the way to go.
• Short-raised panels: These feature beveled rectangular or square shapes. They lend depth and geometric detail, plus they’re perfect for Tudor-, Victorian- or colonial-style homes.
• Long-raised panels: Similar to short-raised panels, these add depth in the form of larger, beveled rectangular panels.
• Painted panels: These are short- or long-raised panels that have had their beveled edges painted in a contrasting or complementary color.
• Windows: Some doors come without windows, but others use them to full effect. Along with allowing natural light inside, they can add a touch of elegance or modernity. They don’t have to go at the top, either. Some designs have several windows stacked in a column on one side.

What materials do garage doors come in?
You’ve selected a style you like, and now it comes down to what material is best. Here’s a quick roundup of the most common materials you have to choose from:
• Steel: This material is hard to beat in terms of durability, price, maintenance and customization. It can be painted and some steel garage doors even feature textures that mimic the look of wood. However, steel is a poor insulator, so you’ll want to add on some insulation to reduce the noise and keep it from getting cold in the winter and hot in the summer.
• Wood: This classic material can complement a rustic home or one with traditional appeal. It tends to insulate better than steel, but keep in mind you’ll need to maintain it regularly to prevent weathering.
• Wood composite: Superior to wood in terms of rot resistance, composite doors are as strong as steel but have the warmth of wood. They can be painted or stained to your liking, as well.
• Aluminum: Similar to steel but lighter in weight and less expensive, aluminum is a great choice with options to add texture and color. It is, however, more prone to dents.
• Fiberglass: If you live in a coastal area, you know how salt water can easily degrade most materials. Thankfully, fiberglass is a lightweight option that is highly resistant to saltwater corrosion. It can be painted, however it offers poor insulation and can fade over time.

What type of garage door opener is best?
Most of us never think about how our openers work. We simply click a button and a few seconds later we can drive in and park the car. Yet if you’re looking to replace your old opener or if you’re selecting a new one, you’ll want to do at least a few comparisons of the type of drive and how much horsepower your opener needs. Don’t forget to add in the height and width of your doors, whether you’ve added insulation, and the material you’ve chosen to get a better idea of which options are best for you.
• Drives: A belt drive is your quietest option, making it the ideal choice for garages located under a bedroom or living area. If you chose a fairly heavy material or large size, however, you’ll want to consider a chain drive. If you’re looking for something quieter than a chain drive and have a single door that tilts open, a screw drive is your best bet.
• Horsepower: How much horsepower you need depends on the size of your door, how quickly you want it to open, and how heavy it is. Heavier doors will need at least 3/4 horsepower, while others may need 1/3 or 1/2 horsepower.

What other garage door parts do I need to consider?
Choosing your style and material is only half the battle. You also need to decide whether you want to add insulation and pick out your springs. That’s not even the end of it! You can also add a garage door lock, a seal or a screen, plus many other options. How’s that for customization?
• Garage Door Insulation: Most insulation is made from polystyrene or polyurethane foam. When choosing insulation, take a look at the R-value, which denotes the thermal property of the insulation. The higher the R-value, the better the insulation.
• Garage Door Springs: Springs come in two different styles: extension and torsion. Torsion springs sit directly above in a coil-style mechanism. It should be noted that only a professional should install or replace your torsion springs — working with them can be potentially hazardous. Torsion springs tend to last longer, though they do cost more up front. Extension springs, on the other hand, run along tracks that are mounted on the ceiling. If you use extension springs, make sure they’re installed with safety retention wires to ensure they don’t fly off and damage property or hurt people if they break.